6
Photo Credit: NHL.com

CANUCKSARMY’S 2018 NHL DRAFT PROFILES: #33 Allan McShane

Allan McShane had a fantastic rookie season in the OHL that saw him moved from the Erie Otters to the Oshawa Generals in the middle of the year.

He looked to take that next step offensively this season, unfortuantely he didn’t break out but still had a really good season that saw him produce well based on the ice time afforded to him.

Known for his playmaking abilities, McShane is a smart player that could hear his name called early on the second day of the NHL Entry Draft.

Bio

  • Age/Birthdate: 17.59/ February 14, 2000
  • Birthplace:Collingwood, ON, CAN
  • Frame:5-foot-11/ 190 lbs
  • Position:Centre
  • Handedness:Left
  • Draft Year Team:Oshawa Generals(OHL)
  • Accomplishments/Awards:
  • 2015-2016
    • OHL Cup Silver Medal
    • YOG Silver Medal
  • 2016-2017
    • OHL First All-Rookie Team
    • U17 WHC Silver Medal
  • 2017-2018
    • U18 WJC Top 3 Player on Team

Stats

Career

McShane was drafted with the 19th overall selection in the 2016 OHL Priority Selection draft by the Erie Otters. He was then moved in January 2017 to the Generals (with a bounty of picks) in exchange for Anthony Cirelli.

After the Generals were eliminated in the playoffs this season, McShane was added to Team Canada for the U18 World Juniors and was named a Top 3 player on Canada.

2017-18 Season

GP G A P SEAL INV% 5v5 Pr INV% 5v5 eP160 Sh/Gp Sh% GF% GF%rel GD60rel XLS% XPR xVAL
67 20 45 65 1.04 26.4% 18.6% 1.89 2.46 12% 54.4% 3.7% 0.44 29% 37.5 2.7

McShane doesn’t stand out in any particular category but does have some interesting numbers. He has decent involvement, shooting rates and GF% despite them not being in the upper percentiles.

His 29% success rate suggests that he is a good bet in the second round.

Adjusted Scoring (SEAL)

Team Relative

McShane did quite well in terms of 5v5 points per 60 minutes. He made the most of the ice time that was given to him and produced. He saw his 5v5 ice time plummet in the middle of the season but then slowly rise back up as he continued to get better every night.

Players go through struggles and McShane was not immune to it this season – but he played really well to close out the year and for Canada at the U18’s.

Cohort Based

His strong rookie season produced a success rate of 33.3% of comparable players going onto NHL regulars. That number saw a slight dip this past season as his production didn’t take that next step but keeping in mind that he had a stronger second half.

Our Take

There are two flaws in his game.

Consistency and skating.

When McShane is on his game, he is noticeable. Using his smart puck movements to set up teammates or controlling the puck on his stick. He has good patience with the puck and the ability to thread passes really well. He isn’t the largest player and thus knows that he can keep the puck moving to avoid having defenders overpower him. When he is off his game, he disappears into the background and easily containable. His second half was really encouraging as he was good in almost every game, even if he didn’t put up points. If his second half is a sign of him rounding the corner, then it’s easy to be excited about his overall game.

His skating lacks explosive two-step quickness and top speed. He is good on his edges but lacks in those other areas. In part, it is because he can be effective in slowing down the game. By taking everything down a step or two, he can move the puck better and find seams in coverage. His skating isn’t horrific but it’s something that likely needs to be improved. With the NHL getting faster, there is concern in this area but it’s fair to believe that it will improve with the desire to do so.

Those flaws to his game are why he is in this group of players and it’s also why he may fall to the back of the pack.

McShane doesn’t shoot the puck with high volume but he does have a very good release to his wrist shot.

He is really smart on the ice and is willing to do anything in all three zones.

It’s a delicate balance to weigh a players deficiencies and strengths. McShane has a well-rounded game that allows him to be effective in the offensive zone and also help in the defensive zone. On the flip side, those concerns to his game are reasons why he may fall a bit. His second half of the season was really encouraging as he improved his consistency, intensity, and his skating wasn’t an issue. If that second half is a sign of things to come, then McShane is a good prospect who makes his teammates better.

Further Reading

Consolidated Average Future Considerations Hockey Prospect.com ISS Hockey McKeen’s The Athletic TSN Bob McKenzie TSN Craig Button The Hockey News Sportsnet ESPN Dobber Prospects
45 44.8 47 $$ $$ 48 42 46 60

From Future Considerations:

A heady average-sized forward, his skating is considered belowaverage. Very little acceleration. Not helping matters is his tendency to not keep his feet moving. On the attack, he manages to be positionally sound. Always a smart player, he possesses elite vision on the ice. With the man advantage, he knows how to distribute the puck, mixing short dishes with cross-ice feeds. But there is a habit of trying to be too cute. McShane’s release is lightning quick – he can propel the puck on net with just a flick of the wrist. In fact, he could stand to use this high-end weapon more often, but he is a passfirst player. Puckhandling is a strength, unleashing passes but also receiving them smoothly. One on one, he can be a dazzling player, neatly stepping around defenders. Oshawa calls on him to kill penalties. He shows flashes of intensity – he’s willing to drop to the ice to block shots – but he is plagued by a lack of intensity. He has a habit of disappearing for periods at a time. Or, despite his vision, he can looked forced into, or shaky with, his decision – blind passes and turnovers. Consistency is his challenge and that low compete level may scare off a few teams. One scout reported the McShane often looks asleep and this affects his two-way game, particularly in the neutral zone where he gets caught flat-footed.

CanucksArmy’s 2018 NHL Draft Rankings

#34 K’Andre Miller
#35 Jacob Olofsson #36 Nathan Dunkley #37 Nils Lundkvist
#38 Jonathan Gruden #39 Filip Hallander #40 Jared McIsaac
#41 Nicolas Beaudin #42 Jack McBain #43 Ty Dellandrea
#44 Jesse Ylonen #45 Mattias Samuelsson #46 Jonny Tychonick
#47 Niklas Nordgren #48 Aidan Dudas #49 GRIGORI DENISENKO
#50 KYLE TOPPING #51 BLADE JENKINS #52 SEAN DURZI
#53 JACK DRURY #54 JAKUB LAUKO #55 JACOB RAGNARSSON
#56 ANDERSON MACDONALD #57 ADAM GINNING #58 FILIP KRAL
#59 Albin Eriksson # 60 Adam Samuelsson #61 Cameron Hillis
#62 Philipp Kurashev #63 BLAKE MCLAUGHLIN #64 MARCUS WESTFELT
#65 MILOS ROMAN #66 OSKAR BACK #67 GABRIEL FORTIER
#68 RILEY SUTTER #69 YEGOR SOKOLOV #70 ALEXANDER KHOVANOV
#71 CURTIS DOUGLAS #72 BENOIT-OLIVIER GROULX #73 SAMPO RANTA
#74 MARCUS KARLBERG #75 AXEL ANDERSSON #76 DAVID LILJA
#77 KODY CLARK #78 DMITRY ZAVGORODNY #79 LINUS NYMAN
#80 LIAM FOUDY #81 LINUS KARLSSON #82 Jachym Kondelik
#83 SCOTT PERNOVICH #84 G JAKUB SKAREK #85 TY EMBERSON
#86 JAY O’BRIEN #87 CARL WASSENIUS #88 VLADISLAV KOTKOV
#89 EMIL WESTERLUND #90 JERRY TURKULAINEN #91 STANISLAV DEMIN
#92 TYLER MADDEN #93 JAN JENIK #94 G OLIVIER RODRIGUE
#95 XAVIER BERNARD #96 KRISTIAN TANUS #97 LUKAS WERNBLOM
#98 NANDO EGGENBERGER #99 MATTHEW STRUTHERS #100 SHAWN BOURDIAS