Report: Hansen Provides a List of Teams For Which He’d Waive His NTC

Trade deadline is fast approaching, now just one week away, and the Canucks are smack in the middle of a bye week. What do you get when those factors are combined? There’s nothing to talk about but trade possibilities!

While the previous deadlines under Benning have given fans good reason to be skeptical of whether they’ll actually sell assets this time around, that possibility appears to have taken one more step towards reality with word getting out that Jannik Hansen has given a list of teams for which he would waive his modified NTC.

TSN midday show host Matt Sekeres drop this tidbit of information today shortly after 10 o’clock, though it’s phrased in a way that should lead you to take it with a helping of salt.


The details of Hansen’s modified no-trade clause can be found on Cap Friendly, and reads as follows:

CLAUSE DETAILS: Player submits a 8 team trade list (team has 45 days to trade player once player submits his list otherwise requested list is voided)

Once Hansen has provided the Canucks with his list of eight teams, the Canucks are free to pull the trigger on a deal with one of those teams without requiring to run it by Hansen again first. Assuming that Hansen provides some semblance of a reasonable list of teams, it shouldn’t be overwhelmingly difficult to find a team that has interest.

“If they’re available for trade, they will be traded,” TSN Insider (and all-around smart hockey guy) Ray Ferraro told the TSN afternoon show on Monday, referring to both Hansen and pending unrestricted free agent Alex Burrows. “There will be high on both of them. Higher interest on Hansen. If they make them available, I don’t know which playoff team wouldn’t be interested in various levels of interest for the two players.”

One potential road block for a Hansen deal could be the looming expansion draft, as noted by TSN’s Bob McKenzie yesterday. “Let’s say there’s a team out there that likes Hansen. They say ‘we’ll give you a second round pick and a pretty good prospect for Jannik Hansen. But the team that’s giving up the second round pick and the prospect now gets Hansen and they have to protect him in the expansion draft. So now they’re losing a real good player in the expansion who they otherwise wouldn’t have to expose. So now the acquisition price for Hansen isn’t just the second round pick and the prospect, it’s now the player they’re gonna lose in the expansion draft as well. So the price starts to go up.”

While McKenzie makes a fair point, I think there are a couple of further points to be made. One is that, even at a diminished return, the Canucks should still be trying their best to move Hansen so as no to risk losing him (or Sven Baertschi or Markus Granlund) at the expansion draft for absolutely nothing.

The other thing to note is that not every team is in dire straights when it comes to forwards that need protecting. Hell, not even every playoff bound team is. Anaheim, for instance, has to protect Corey Perry, Ryan Getzlaf and Ryan Kesler due to their no-movement clauses, but then has four spots left for Rickard Rackell, Jacob Silfverberg, Andrew Cogliano, Antoine Vermette and Jared Boll. Boll is expendable, and Vermette is 34 with just one year left on his contract – he could be a palatable loss, though that’s unlikely to happen given that Anaheim is most likely going to be forced to expose one of Hampus Lindholm, Sami Vatanen and Cam Fowler, essentially serving as protection for the forwards. Might Hansen be willing to reunite with Kesler and Kevin Bieksa?

That isn’t the only option either, as Boston, currently tied for the final wild card spot, looks like they could easily afford to protect Hansen as well. The same goes for San Jose and St. Louis, who are both in good positions in their divisions.

Then you get to the pure Cup contenders like Pittsburgh and Washington. Pittsburgh has recently lost Bryan Rust for the remainder of the season, and could be looking to replace him. Pittsburgh, the defending champions, could be one of the teams who are in a “shoot first, take questions later” mode when it comes to trading and the expansion draft. The possibility of consecutive Cups could temp them to take a risk on losing a player in the expansion draft.

Ditto for the Washington Capitals, who are again looking like the favourites to win the President’s Trophy and probably don’t want to bow out of the playoffs early yet again. With T.J Oshie and Justin Williams’ contracts expiring at the end of the year, the Caps don’t know how long their window will be open. That seems like a window for Jim Benning to get a deal done to pad their roster in preparation for the postseason.

With one year left on his deal at a very reasonable $2.5 million, Hansen doesn’t have to be limited to a serious contender. Teams like Dallas, Carolina, or Toronto could probably afford to take him and protect him as well.

While there are plenty of possibilities around the league, what is really important to the completion of a deal is that Hansen picks a team (or better yet, teams) that have both an interest and the capability to take him on. Here’s hoping that he plays ball – the Canucks and their fans both desperately need a win at this trade deadline.

  • NucksWingman

    One thing to consider regarding Hansen and the expansion draft.. Any team acquiring Hansen could just think of him as a rental player. They can use Hansen as bait for Vegas so the acquiring team doesn’t have to lose one of its current players in the expansion draft.

    • TD

      I agree, but he’s more than just a rental because if Vegas selects him the team won’t lose the another asset. He would be providing that team the player they will lose thereby protecting their other assets. That could also be a valuable chip for the team to have.

  • Ragnarok Ouroboros

    I’m tired of seeing the Canucks get handcuffed by No Trade clauses like Luongo, Vrbata, and Hamhuis.

    I’d like to eventually see no trade clauses banned from contracts. At the very least they should be limited. IE the player has to submit 8 teams from either the top 16 or bottom 16 teams in the league as the discretion of their current team.

    Right now Hansen’s no trade clause is like a poison pill clause, he can really screw the team if he wants to.

    • sh1t4brains

      Ummm…u got it the other way around. Hansen has been good to you guys given his contract and what he has given over the years. EDIT: as a player who is competitive, your goal is always to win the cup. He would be foolish to pass up going to a contending team if those teams come calling. He can always come back…assuming the stars align. it is a win win for both parties

    • apr

      Totally agree. I think people are finally understanding why Benning could not trade Vrbata last year and that Dallas basically had Benning over a barrel. It would not surprise me at all of Hansen’s or Miller’s list is full of non playoff teams.

      • Vanoxy

        He may have been over the barrel, but he was offered lube, which he chose to decline.

        It’s true that he had a de-valued asset, due to the NTC. But he chose to piss away an asset for 0 return rather than play the hand he was dealt and get what he could.

        His options were, take something or end up with nothing. He chose door #2. That tells me he’s more concerned with winning a dick measuring contest than he is with improving the team he is being paid to manage.

        There were assets on the table. And they stayed on the table instead of ending up in his pocket. That’s a net loss for JB.

        Something > nothing

    • crofton

      Plus if the player has a NTC and demands a trade, the NT part becomes invalid, and management can trade him wherever they want. It would have worked perfectly with Kesler…apparently many teams in Lower Slobbovia were looking for Treacherous centres.(Belichek did it for a player whose name I forget, sending him to Cleveland….isn’t that the Lower Slobbovia of the NFL?) But seriously that clause should not hamper management in that situation

    • TheRealPB

      Every team is “handcuffed” by these (or other) clauses. It’s called a contract and there’s always a give and take. Given that athletes have fairly limited autonomy about where they can ply their trade — especially in the early parts of their career due to the draft, ownership of their rights and restrictions on free agency, I don’t think it’s too onerous to have them earn the freedom to choose whether or not they’ll have to move around without their consent. And before anyone goes on about how this is all about the privilege of millionaires, given that less than 2% of college and junior players actually make it to the NHL (for an average career of less than four years) the advantage is mostly still with the teams.

      These “perks” are one of the only real points of leverage you have when dipping into the FA market in a hard cap era. If you want to be able to lure players to your team you have to be able to offer these things. They aren’t going away and the Canucks are certainly not the only team that gives them out.

  • Jabs

    I’m sure Hansen wants to compete in the playoffs but what if he really doesn’t want to move, especially considering he is under contract for a year.

    Maybe his list of 6 teams is comprised of teams he knows are the least apt to trade for him. I guess there are plenty of what if’s but I’m sure Hansen is doing his best to get in a position where he doesn’t end up in Vegas next year.

  • andyg

    With Svens concussion troubles I would just leave him unprotected.

    Hansen should only be moved if the return is top end. he would resign and could play for another five years.

  • Bure's Flow

    HANSEN’S LIST:
    1) Winnipeg; I miss my old AHL winter town 🙁
    2) Chicago; secretly I like losing to them, why not win with them.
    3) Phoenix; they have good golfing
    4) Colorado; Sakic is my hero
    5)Carolina; me and Lack best buds
    6)Boston…jk.no really Boston
    7) Pittsburgh; Stanley Cup?
    8)Rangers; Filet Mignon has been textin’

  • Steamer

    Regrettable situation with Vegas. Hansen will be missed: versatile, fast, with improved ability to finish – and an excellent teammate. Should be highly sought after by any Cup contender and maybe a few pretenders – hopefully the compensation, whether pick(s) or prospect is significant.

  • Vanoxy

    The expansion draft is a concern, but it isn’t the end of the world.
    There’s another window, post season, pre expansion draft, for trades to be made.

    A contending team like Washington, San Jose or Pittsburgh will do what they need to do to pad their roster for the post season, and deal with the fallout prior to the draft.

    And, every team will lose 1, and only 1 player to Vegas. So a team with a glut of draft eligible players shouldn’t be too afraid of adding 1 more to the mix. Adding a guy like Hansen provides either a buffer, or a replacement for an existing player

    • Silverback

      I agree, but at what cost? If a team gives up a 2nd rounder, and loses said player in the expansion draft, that is expensive. If a 5th or later is given up, that would be acceptable. Would Canucks take a 5th for Hansen?

    • Silverback

      I hope he goes to a playoff team…Anaheim? We can root for Bieksa and Hansen, and hopefully witness Kesler get creamed by his opponents. It would be win-win.

      • sh1t4brains

        I hated Kes even when he was with you guys and hated him even more when he screwed you guys with the trade.

        However, he was within his rights with his NTC or LNTC arranged by MG.

        Would like Bieksa and Hansen to win as both were/are what the Nucks really want in their players.

  • Braindead Benning

    Anyway, if the bluejackets have declared that in the 2017 draft they would give the Canucks the 2nd round compensation for torts old Jimbo the “meat and potatoes” dude would have already had the plan and the ammunition to include that in any Hansen deal to get another Vey type waiver elidible player and a 5th.

  • TheRealRusty

    Unless we can net an early to mid 1st rounder or a good prospect (highly doubtful in this market), I would hold on to Hansen and expose Barteschi (Vegas is almost certain to pick up Sbisa anyways). He is one of our hardest workers, a leader that will hold others accountable and on a cap friendly contract.

  • Dirty30

    With 10 picks in the upcoming draft, I would suggest targeting Chicago to make a deal to pry as many of those out of their hands as possible.

    Sending a player and some lower picks for a handful of mid-range picks would put Benning in his wheelhouse for finding those prospects who can potentially pan out higher than currently ranked.

    Benning can add in some future considerations as well.

    But trading Hansen and two of the lowest Canucks picks for four of Chicago’s higher picks, gives the Canucks 7 picks — mid-range or better, and leaves Chicago with their top picks and lower ones for a total of 8 picks.

    Chicago can still use those lower picks to made deals with Vegas to protect a player or two if needed.

    If CBJ adds in the Torts second, Benning could draft 8 players.

    All for the cost of Hansen and the two lowest picks we currently have.

  • Freud

    Why do I have a feeling Benning will trade a 2nd rounder to Vegas in exchange for McPhee agreeing to take Biega?

    He might have two 2nds, so why not give another one away?

    That way he can keep Hansen and Sbisa. Re-sign Burrows and Miller and compete again next year!

      • TheRealRusty

        I could not agree with you less. You are now giving up 2 assets to Vegas instead of 1… Protect Hansen & Granlund, expose Sbisa & Sven. Any sane GM will choose Sbisa over Sven.

    • Dirty30

      Because the Canucks have the fewest draft picks among 30 teams at five, and while your solution helps to keep the players on the team it does nada to address the fact that this team is sitting at the bottom of the league and no clear way out.

      So why trade a decent pick to keep a guy who is over 30 and can be traded for younger assets to help the future of this team?